Alday Murders, 1973 Photo by Charles Postell

The five Alday men's bodies remained in the home when Charles Postell arrived on the scene in Donalsonville, Georgia. River Road, a straight shot of pavement through the rural Seminole County of good ole boys of the tightest-cinched Bible Belt, would forever be a haunted trail. Not far from the residence, down a logging road, was the body of Mary Alday, wife of Jerry Alday, who had been left naked and dead in a fire ant bed. "Get them goddam fire ants off that baby," Sheriff Dan White said at the scene.

The five Alday men’s bodies remained in the home when Charles Postell arrived on the scene in Donalsonville, Georgia. River Road, a straight shot of pavement through the rural Seminole County of good ole boys of the tightest-cinched Bible Belt, would forever be a haunted trail. Not far from the residence, down a logging road, was the body of Mary Alday, wife of Jerry Alday, who had been left naked and dead in a fire ant bed.
“Get them goddam fire ants off that baby,” Sheriff Dan White said at the scene.

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CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR: “Press freedom issue raised” POSTELL AND GBI: 4th AMENDMENT VIOLATED, RULED JUDGE WILBUR OWENS

CHARLES POSTELL, arrested by GBI after his home office was searched illegally while agents were in his home under pretense of protecting Postell and his family, became his own ┬ábest story. A storied and notorious career as an investigative journalist had led to being framed by the state law agency he’d often written unflattering articles for The Albany Herald, where he was state editor. US District Judge Wilbur Owens – who hadn’t been a fan of Postell’s but knew dirt when he saw it – ruled the search had been illegal and violated 4th amendment rights. The Albany Herald’s publishers, Jim Gray, Sr. and his son Jim Gray, Jr. filed a $5.5 million lawsuit against the GBI on behalf of Postell.

http://www.csmonitor.com/1980/0829/.Uvl69FzN0x0.email

GBI list of items taken from Postell’s home office

GBI list of items taken from Postell's home office

Charles Postell, investigative journalist and state editor for The Albany Herald, faced charges of aiding and abetting a death row escape from Georgia State Prison after the state police agency illegally searched his home office under the guise of being present to protect Postell and his family from escapees.

Charles Postell’s home office after GBI illegal search and seizure

Charles Postell's home office after GBI illegal search and seizure

Postell’s career as an investigative journalist included many exposes on law officials, and agents of the Georgia Bureau of Investigation (GBI). After 4 inmates escaped from Georgia State Prison’s Death Row, they claimed to be protecting Postell and his family, arriving at the Postell home with guns and staying overnight.

Postell caught one of the agents rifling through his office files in the middle of the night. The next day the agents returned with a search warrant and went directly to the files which had been pilfered.

Charges were brought against Postell and wife Judi, but later dismissed following an FBI sting which foiled an extortion attempt.

This led to a $5.5 million lawsuit against the GBI for illegal search and seizure, opening up open discourse about 4th amendment rights violations